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Hair on Barbed Wire ~ Portraits of Ranching Life

debI am so excited and I want to share! 

16 was a dark time for me, but one of the bright spots in my life back then was working with Deb Raney. I was living in Frenchglen, Oregon, working at the Frenchglen Hotel and the Mercantile. Frenchglen is 60 miles from Burns, I think the winter months had a population of 5, that included the school teacher, the Fines, Malena and myself. The summer there were a few more of us. Deb was one of them. 

I am scared to death and I mean DEATH of snakes but I touched my first rattler while driving to Denio with her. We were driving back in the dark and decided we would “blind” the snake and stun it with beer cans so I could pet it… I do not suggest this as a method of greeting rattlers. 

She took me to my first ghost town brothel, we gorged on smores and laughed non stop! We toodled around the Steens in that awesome blue car of hers =) going places no car should go. 

Deb saved my sanity back then, I am not sure I have ever said thank you to her… so Thank you Deb! 

Now my friend is a published author!!! I cannot wait to get my hands on this book and start reading it. She has such a way with words. She used to write a blurb in the little local paper in Burns, she is amazing. I am hoping you too will check out her book and support a small town girl who had a dream and made it come true!! 

You can purchase a book at the link below or let me know and I can steer you in her direction. 

http://inkwater.com/books/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=1196&search=hair+on+barbed+wire

The life of a rancher is a life full of laughter, love and beauty. It can also be a life full of challenges, tears and a lot of dust. Debbie Raney has lived this life for over 50 years in Eastern Oregon’s high desert, with 30-plus of those years as a ranchwife.

Hair on Barbed Wire is a collection of her poetry, stories and photographs that celebrates the commitment ranchers and their families have to the land and their livelihood. Beginning with an insight into the scars and callouses on a ranchwife’s hands, and ending with a tribute to those who share her love for ranching, Debbie gives a unique perspective into the experiences only those who have “been there, done that” could know.

 

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